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Release Date: 20th July 2018

Label: Hibernacula Records

Genre: Mathcore

The first comment to make regarding Death Goals is how refreshing and actually interesting it is to hear a two-piece band who don’t sound like a tribute act to The White Stripes. While many music duos would insist they create a more unique sound than a ripoff of Jack White, Death Goals succeed in producing a noise closer to the likes of The Chariot or Heck; something unexpected from a two-piece (and all the more welcome, now that the aforementioned bands are no longer with us).

Death Goals successfully balance the heaviness and pure chaotic noise you’d expect from mathcore with a fun, light-hearted attitude. Whether that be opening a track with a sample from The Mighty Boosh that is longer than the composition itself, or song titles such as ‘That’s A Gold Hat, Cool Cat’. Additionally, the inclusion of silly guitar noises are a plus for that chaotic/mathy sound; a feature that many aspiring bands of the mathcore genre fail to include.

Despite being only six tracks and 10 minutes long, the self-titled release showcases a good variety of noise from the duo. Whether it be the 30 second grind assault of ‘Stacyletmeseeyourstegosaurs’, the slamming breakdown that closes ‘Those Closest To You Hold The Sharpest Knives’, or the groovy riffs dotted through ‘That’s A Gold Hat, Cool Cat’ (which is incidentally the EP’s longest track, clocking in at just over a whopping 2 minutes 30 seconds). The instrumental-heavy closing track, ‘Trendy Modern Wankers’ (featuring another Mighty Boosh sample) provides a sufficiently heavy end to the EP, almost as if to restore order after the mayhem that ensued during the previous tracks.

The EP features good production that is appropriate for the style, with the drums successfully filling the space created by the lack of bass and rhythm guitar. The vocals have the gain cranked up, reminiscent of artists like Nails, which definitely adds to the aggression needed for the music. There is great variety in tempo and feel throughout the EP and showcases a very mathcore sound without resorting to showing off with technical wizardry. Somewhat contrasting to the sound of the music and the light-hearted image the band presents, the lyrics deal with subjects such as relationships, depression, and what appears to be an accusation against a sexual deviant, illustrating that Death Goals have some important issues to share and address – even if it is through the medium of noisy mathcore.

Overall, this is an impressive release from the London duo. The short but varied EP will leave listeners wanting more and hopefully entice them to see the band live (don’t worry, the band deliver on that front too). The only criticism that can be made is the inclusion of an intro track of feedback driven noise. Yes it can be argued that it sets the tone for the songs to come, but on a six-track EP it’s somewhat unnecessary, and runs the risk of being skipped. Still, an excellent release; I’d definitely show you my stegosaurus, boys.

8/10

Recommended track: ‘That’s A Gold Hat, Cool Cat’