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Release Date: 20th March 2018

Label: Independent

Genre: Math Rock

Based in Linlithgow, Scotland the excellently named Flux Velociraptor is a three piece playing noisy, math rock influenced instrumental music. Their six track EP, Velociraptor Attractor was released last month and demonstrates why they are starting to garner some attention. It’s not always easy to make completely instrumental tracks which retain the listener’s interest for their duration. However, on this record the band have succeeded in creating pieces that deftly tread the balance between proggy experimentalism and more conventionally crafted heavy riffs.

‘Evolutionists’ begins with the sound of haunting noises and a staggered, staccato approach. There are a number of complex time signature changes at work here, as is the case across the EP. The song varies between the noisy caterwaul of feedback heavy guitar parts and thrashy drums to more precise linear sounding sections. The songs all have multiple rhythms which drop in and out, sometimes generating a discordance before coming back together with tight synchronicity.

‘Billy Everyteen’ layers spacelike accompaniment over a sixteen beat and repeated guitar motif. The effect is to create an almost computerised sound that has a tinge of synthwave to it. This then segues into the latter part of the song which builds upon the guitar part with some rockier sounding instrumentation.

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‘They Do Move in Herds’ opens with punctuated stabs of noise. This fairly sparse start then leads into a later riff that has a real sludgy quality to it. The tempo changes a number of times without missing a beat, demonstrative of some expert musicianship. The amusingly named ‘Written by Bono and the Edge’ (I would guess this is an ironic nod to the U2 members rather than all out fandom), is a pretty minimal affair. It is structured around a repeated central riff which is underscored with irregular drum patterns and electronic sounding accents.

‘How to Be a Retronaut’ begins with a convoluted introduction before going into a section where each instrument plays individually, mirroring the central riff. This then develops into a slightly more regular structure with the drums accentuating off beats and throwing in a range of rolls. The call and response approach leads into a swampier sound midway through the song which gradually builds up into a much faster section. This uptempo stop-start riff sees the song almost to its conclusion with a final diminishing sound of guitar fuzz closing the EP.

‘Velociraptor Attractor’ is a really interestingly constructed record, which demonstrates a technical approach coupled with an ear for a killer riff. At times it veers from quite loose sounding noise music to the intricacy of parts that sound almost jazzy. This is all pulled off without feeling as if the songs get bogged down, or become gratuitously complicated. This EP is a strong statement of intent and suggests that the guys in Flux Velociraptor have huge potential to continue forging their own uncompromising style.

Recommended Track: They Do Move in Herds

Rating: 7.5/10

You can buy the EP here and keep up to date with Flux Velociraptor on Facebook and Twitter.

Credit to Bruce Cowie for photographs.